HOME INTRODUCTION ABOUT IHLS PROGRAMME KEYNOTE SPEAKERS VENUE CONTACT
Professor Phillip D Long Prof Carl Edwin Wieman Prof John Seely Brown

Phil is the Associate Vice Provost for Learning Sciences and Deputy Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, Clinical Professor in Educational Psychology and in the School of Information, at the University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Long provides leadership to the university’s strategy for technology enhanced learning. Phil contributes leadership to UTx, the local implementation of the edX MOOCs, the UT learning analytics initiative & design of learning environments.

Phil’s current research interests focus on active & blended learning pedagogies, remote laboratories, emerging technologies and the analytics that can be captured by instrumenting interactions in both virtual and environments with the goal of informing learner decision-making. Read More

Carl Wieman holds a joint appointment as Professor of Physics and of the Graduate School of Education, Stanford University. He has done extensive experimental research in atomic and optical physics. His current intellectual focus is now on undergraduate physics and science education. He has pioneered the use of experimental techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of various teaching strategies for physics and other sciences, and recently served as Associate Director for Science in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

In 2001, he won the Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Eric Allin Cornell and Wolfgang Ketterle for fundamental studies of the Bose-Einstein condensate. In 2004, he was named United States Professor of the Year among all doctoral and research universities. Read More

John Seely Brown (JSB) was the Chief Scientist of Xerox Corporation until April 2002 as well as the director of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) until June 2000. A master integrator and instigator of productive friction, JSB explores the whitespace between disciplines and builds bridges between disparate organizations and ideas.

In his more than two decades at PARC, Brown transformed the organization into a truly multidisciplinary research center at the creative edge of applied technology and design, integrating social sciences and arts into the traditional physics and computer science research and expanding the role of corporate research to include topics such as the management of radical innovation, organizational learning, complex adaptive systems, and nano-technologies. Read More